China vice president vows to 'look after' stock market investors


By John Micklethwait and John Fraher
Bloomberg News
Thursday, January 21, 2016

China is willing to keep intervening in the stock market to make sure that a few speculators don't benefit at the expense of regular investors, China's vice president said in an interview.

Calling the country’s market "not yet mature," Vice President Li Yuanchao said the government would boost regulation in an effort to avoid too much volatility.

"An excessively fluctuating market is a market of speculation where only the few will gain the most benefit when most people suffer," Li said in an interview with Bloomberg News after arriving at the World Economic Forum's annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. "The Chinese government is going to look after the interests of most of the people, most of the investors."

Li, 65, is the most senior Chinese official yet to underline the government's readiness to intervene should the market turmoil of last summer and the start of 2016 continue. ...

... For the remainder of the report:


Silver mining stock report comes with 1-ounce silver round

Future Money Trends is offering a special 18-page silver mining stock report about how to profit with the monetary and industrial metal, and it comes with a free 1-ounce silver round. Proceeds from the report's sales are shared with the Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee to support its efforts to expose manipulation in the monetary metals markets. To learn about this report, please visit:

Join GATA here:

Vancouver Resource Investment Conference
Vancouver Convention Centre West
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Sunday-Monday, January 24-25, 2016

Support GATA by purchasing DVDs of GATA's London conference in August 2011 or GATA's Dawson City conference in August 2006:

Or by purchasing a colorful GATA T-shirt:

Or a colorful poster of GATA's full-page ad in The Wall Street Journal on January 31, 2009:

Help keep GATA going

GATA is a civil rights and educational organization based in the United States and tax-exempt under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Its e-mail dispatches are free, and you can subscribe at:

To contribute to GATA, please visit: