Cash ban only taught Indians not to trust the banking system

Section:

India's Cash Ban Failed Even to Create a Bank Savings Culture

By Mihir Sharma
Bloomberg News
Saturday, September 1, 2018

The Indian central bank's final tally of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's 2016 demonetization drive, intended to take money derived from tax evasion out of circulation, showed that 99.3 percent of outlawed high-value banknotes had been returned. That's a severe loss of face for officials, who had argued that holders of the cash would rather destroy it than return it to banks, providing a windfall for the government.

... Dispatch continues below ...



ADVERTISEMENT

A Network of Bullion Dealers Who Bid for Your Business

With a SmartMetals® account from the Hard Assets Alliance, you're always guaranteed the lowest prices for gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. When you buy bullion through your account, the alliance's network of trusted precious metals dealers launches into action -- and you'll be shown the lowest price for your purchase. Also amazing is the low-cost storage available to you in six non-bank vaults around the world.

Click here to learn more:

http://www.hardassetsalliance.com/go/v34pm4/GAT



The authorities managed to produce several other defenses of the initiative, however. One in particular was appealing to financial markets: The notion that, in Finance Minister Arun Jaitley's words, "Demonetization appears to have led to an acceleration in the financialization of savings." Households that traditionally kept their savings in cash would now prefer to put the money into other instruments, perhaps even the stock market. This would increase the amount of capital available for companies to deploy and banks to lend, spurring economic growth. ...

Unfortunately, the Reserve Bank of India punched a hole in that hypothesis, too. Its annual report, as well as tallying the result of demonetization, provided a breakdown of savings by households, a category that includes small and unregistered enterprises. It turns out that net financial savings for the fiscal year that ended March 31 were 7.1 percent of overall disposable income -- less than the average for the five years prior to demonetization.

Worse yet, perhaps, households are keeping far more of their net savings in cash, not less. And their net savings going to banks are almost 50 percent lower than the five-year average before demonetization. In other words, the idea that the crackdown would leave banks flush with household savings that they could lend to productive parts of the economy has been comprehensively debunked. ...

What's going on? Some have argued that lower interest rates are the problem. That's not an easy sell: Over the past year, India was one of the few countries with strongly positive real rates -- and savings in bank deposits were a higher fraction of disposable income back in 2012-14, when Indians were dealing with negative real interest rates.

Perhaps, instead, a change in behavior is responsible. For most Indians, the defining experience of demonetization was losing access to their bank accounts: We had to stand in long lines at ATMs, and our withdrawals were strictly rationed. In contrast, those who had piles of old banknotes appeared to be able to change them (at a black-market-determined discount) with ease.

What would you learn from this? Would you trust a banking system that can be closed down on a prime minister's whim? ...

... For the remainder of the commentary:

https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2018-09-02/indian-demonetization...

* * *

Join GATA here:

New Orleans Investment Conference
Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel
Thursday-Sunday, November 1-4, 2018
http://neworleansconference.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/NOIC_2018_Pow...

* * *

Help keep GATA going

GATA is a civil rights and educational organization based in the United States and tax-exempt under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Its e-mail dispatches are free, and you can subscribe at:

http://www.gata.org

To contribute to GATA, please visit:

http://www.gata.org/node/16