John Dizard: Paranoid theories can't take the shine off gold

Section:

4p CT Saturday, October 10, 2009

Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:

Score a small victory for our side this week: Financial Times columnist John Dizard took note of one of the many official documents recently disclosed about the gold price suppression scheme.

Yes, Dizard did so in a misleading, incomplete, and mocking way, but notice is notice, Step 2 in Gandhi's dictum: "First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you. And then you win."

Dizard suggests that the culprit in goldbug paranoid conspiracy theory is constantly changing, "from JPMorgan, the U.S. Federal Reserve, and Goldman Sachs (of course), to miner Barrick Gold or George Soros." We've never heard Soros cited, but the full range of documentation amassed over the years shows that the suppression scheme is superintended by the U.S. Treasury Department and Federal Reserve, using the Western European central banks, the New York bullion banks, and, at least until recently, Barrick Gold as their instruments. With the Fed now admittedly distributing trillions in secret on a patronage basis and refusing to identify the recipients, and with the Fed admittedly having made gold swap agreements with "foreign banks" and insisting that these agreements remain secret as well, why should anything suggested here seem so implausible?

More important, instead of prompting his mere pontification, why should complaints about the gold price suppression scheme not prompt Dizard to attempt journalism -- as, say, by calling the Fed about the purposes of those gold swap agreements and the purposes of the secrecy around them?

Dizard remarks that goldbugs have an obsessive and even religious devotion to gold. Maybe some do, just as some purported journalists have an obsessive and even religious devotion to placating the establishment. But for most goldbugs gold is only a means to an end, not an end itself; they are not idolaters but adherents of limited government and individual liberty, the ends to which gold's function as a free-trading currency are put, or would be put if gold ever was free-trading again.

And even as Dizard mocks the premise of gold price suppression he confirms it. He writes: "Gold could move the larger financial world directly if central banks tied the level and rate of currency issuance directly to their gold reserves or to the metal's price. Central banks, or a shadowy Doctor Evil, do not need to manipulate the price of gold if the price does not limit their freedom of action. What matters to governments is their ability to finance themselves through bond sales. This would be hampered if the bonds' value was being eroded by higher inflation, or by devaluation of the currency relative to other currencies. And that is what the gold price is beginning to tell us."

Yes, Mr. Dizard, part of the interest central banks have in suppressing the gold price is exactly to conceal inflation and currency devaluation so as to restrain interest rates and maintain the value of their currencies and government bonds. That is just what those loopy goldbugs have been saying for years. It is what government officials themselves have acknowledged in so many documents Dizard has not yet gotten around to ridiculing. But a little more ridicule from Dizard may be good if it sparks the curiosity of actual journalists to look into the facts before opining too much.

Dizard's commentary is appended.

CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

* * *

Paranoid Theories Can't Take the Shine Off Gold

By John Dizard
Financial Times, London
Friday, October 9, 2009

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f149a1a8-b4fe-11de-8b17-00144feab49a.html

They asked me to write about the goldbugs' point of view, including the paranoia and conspiracy theories about gold. You know. "Them." The request could have come in any number of ways: a note composed from cut-up newspaper headlines, or a "suggestion" from a muffled voice over the phone. In this case, it was an "FT editor." I can only speculate about his true identity.

If you immerse yourself in the world of goldbuggery, the nothing-is-what-it-seems worldview can become that infectious. The paranoia of the goldbugs, die-hard believers in the value of the metal, has been with us a long time, intensifying since the collapse of the last great gold bull market in the early 1980s. Now, though, the goldbugs' resolute disbelief in the legitimacy and value of official currencies is influencing mainstream market opinion, helped by this week's record price of $1,061 per Troy ounce.

The fundamental premise of goldbug conspiracy theory is that the metal would have continued to hold and even increase its value over the years against the "fiat" currencies if there had not been a sustained, secret intervention on the part of some powerful group of market manipulators. The speculated-upon identity of the "Hand," or "Seller," or "Manager" varied over the years, from JPMorgan, the U.S. Federal Reserve, and Goldman Sachs (of course), to miner Barrick Gold or George Soros.

Underlying all the conspiracy theories are two convictions: Gold is the only true measure of value, and the people in charge share the goldbugs' belief in the centrality of the gold market in the organisation of the economic and financial world.

The first premise has both a material and a religious aspect. In the material world, gold's chemical stability, rarity, and ductility have in all societies made it a precious asset. However, that very scarcity and weight, along with the need to re-assay gold offered as payment, limit its usefulness as a medium of exchange for a world with today's volume of trade. While it is a useful, and, over the longest term, essential, store of monetary value, there is a limit to the degree to which it can substitute for paper or electronic currencies.

The utility of gold as a store of value can, for the obsessive, verge on religious devotion, or even love, despite the Bible's admonition that "the love of money is the root of all evil." A true goldbug would probably say this applies only to the government's money.

The second premise, that the committee or committees that run the economy do so through their setting of the gold price, had some basis in truth when governments or central banks were willing to buy and sell gold to set their currency's exchange rates. The U.S. government's willingness to do that with the public ended in 1933, and its sales of gold to official counterparties ended in 1971.

For a few years after the 1971 "closing of the gold window," the end of U.S. government gold sales, there was residual interest in foreign governments' valuation of their gold reserves. A website popular with goldbugs, Zero Hedge, recently revealed a 1975 Federal Reserve memorandum to President Gerald Ford, in which an argument between the Treasury and the Fed is outlined. Zero Hedge describes the memo as a "smoking gun," and goes on to say: "So to all conspiracy theorists claiming that gold is being manipulated on a daily basis by the Federal Reserve: When it occurs over and over, and is so well documented, it is no longer a theory."

The memo itself is rather less dramatic and has nothing to do with manipulation on a daily basis. Essentially, the Fed chairman, then Arthur Burns, was telling Mr. Ford that if the French buy lots of gold it will lead to an increase in world liquidity and more inflation. As usual, Mr. Burns was wrong. Gold was not necessary to inflate or deflate world liquidity; that could be done through money market operations by government currency issuers, including the French and the Americans.

Gold could move the larger financial world directly if central banks tied the level and rate of currency issuance directly to their gold reserves or to the metal's price. Central banks, or a shadowy Doctor Evil, do not need to manipulate the price of gold if the price does not limit their freedom of action. What matters to governments is their ability to finance themselves through bond sales. This would be hampered if the bonds' value was being eroded by higher inflation, or by devaluation of the currency relative to other currencies.

And that is what the gold price is beginning to tell us. The investing public may be too worried about imminent inflation; more likely, given the continued weakness in employment and wages, not to mention housing, we will have weak dollar-measured general price inflation. However, in spite of mantra-like official statements to the contrary, it would seem that the U.S. government wants to competitively devalue its way to national prosperity.

That hasn't worked yet, since the trade-weighted dollar is about where it was at the beginning of the crisis, but I am confident that if a government wants to debase its currency, it can ultimately succeed in doing so.

One of the advantages of being a goldbug now, or becoming one soon, is that it is one commodity whose price is not likely to be manipulated below its market-equilibrium level by the U.S. government. ("Them," if you prefer.) There will be attempts to limit speculation in such essential commodities as oil, grains, or base metals, but a gold price rise would simply represent a successful devaluation.

So while the goldbugs' conspiracy theories are chimerical, their investment strategy is at last aligning with that of the real world.

-----

The writer is an FT columnist.

* * *

Support GATA by purchasing a colorful GATA T-shirt:

http://gata.org/tshirts

Or a colorful poster of GATA's full-page ad in The Wall Street Journal on January 31, 2009:

http://www.cartserver.com/sc/cart.cgi

Or a video disc of GATA's 2005 Gold Rush 21 conference in the Yukon:

http://www.goldrush21.com/

* * *

Help keep GATA going

GATA is a civil rights and educational organization based in the United States and tax-exempt under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Its e-mail dispatches are free, and you can subscribe at:

http://www.gata.org

To contribute to GATA, please visit:

http://www.gata.org/node/16