Bond market derivatives now offer profit without risk

Section:

A Billion-Dollar Game

By John Dizard
Financial Times, London
Monday, October 23, 2006

http://us.ft.com/ftgateway/superpage.ft?news_id=fto102320061114181979&re...

Free money. Profit -- profit on billions of dollars of capital -- without risk. Too good to be true, right? Tell it to the people putting on "negative basis trades."

Adrian Ash: Quantum Finance and the scramble for gold

Section:

By Adrian Ash
The Market Oracle
Saturday, January 6, 2007

http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article204.html

Only in finance do the losers get to write history. The government then prints their memoirs in the statute books, while a new volume of folly and greed is begun.

Witness Barnard's Act of 1734. It sought "to prevent the infamous practice of stock-jobbing" that had peaked and exploded with the South Sea Bubble of 1720. Investors had long since fled Change Alley, however, and gone back to trading government bonds instead.

Markets misread 'strong dollar' policy, Harvard economist says

Section:

From Reuters
Saturday, January 6, 2006

http://asia.news.yahoo.com/070106/3/2vcq6.html

CHICAGO -- A misunderstanding by financial markets of the so-called "strong dollar" mantra preached by U.S. officials is helping keep the U.S. currency overpriced and contributing to bloated external deficits, Harvard University economist Martin Feldstein said on Saturday.

Speaking on a panel on the U.S. current account deficit at the Allied Social Sciences Conventions, Feldstein outlined several factors that are holding the dollar at an overly high, and unsustainable, level.

Wall Street Journal examines struggle to start mining in Mongolia

Section:

Mongolia Is Roiled
By Miner's Huge Plans

World-Class Deposits
Spur Battle for Spoils;
Makeover for 'Toxic Bob'

By Patrick Barta
The Wall Street Journal
Thursday, January 4, 2007

OYU TOLGOI, Mongolia -- When Robert Friedland first set foot on this desolate land in 2001, the mining magnate saw a windswept desert, some rocks, and the opportunity to turn Mongolia into the world's next big natural-resources play.

'Infinite money and its consquences' is theme of CMRE spring meeting in NYC

Section:

12:54p ET Saturday, January 6, 2007

Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:

The spring dinner meeting of the Committee for Monetary Research and Education, scheduled for Thursday, May 10, in New York City, will have a theme of great interest to our crowd: "Infinite Money and Its Consequences." Among the speakers:

-- Henry C.K. Liu, economics writer for Asia Times and monetary policy adviser to several governments.

'Infinite money and its consequences' is theme of CMRE spring meeting in NYC

Section:

12:48p ET Saturday, January 6, 2007

Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:

The spring dinner meeting of the Committee for Monetary Research and Education, scheduled for Thursday, May 10, in New York City, will have a theme of great interest to our crowd: "Infinite Money and Its Consequences." Among the speakers:

-- Henry C.K. Liu, economics writer for Asia Times and monetary policy adviser to several governments.

Business Week welcomes more decline in the dollar

Section:

Why The Dollar's Decline Isn't A Downer

A steep drop is unlikely, and there are advantages to a further slide

Business Week
Issue of January 15, 2007

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_03/b4017032.htm?chan=top...

Back in 2002, billionaire investor George Soros boldly warned that the U.S. dollar's value could plunge by a third over the next few years. He was pretty much on target. Since the greenback's peak in early 2002, it has dropped 35% against the euro, 28% vs. a trade-weighted basket of major currencies, and 18% vs. the currencies of all countries the U.S. does business with. What's interesting is, nothing bad happened--except maybe for those investors who didn't sell the dollar short, as Mr. Soros presumably did.

MineWeb: Central bank gold purchase was only bookkeeping adjustment

Section:

By Lawrence Williams
MineWeb.com
Friday, January 5, 2007

LONDON -- The recently reported "gold purchase" by an ECB central bank does not appear to be a purchase per se but only an adjustment relating to the refining of gold coins which had previously only been recorded under "other assets" in the central bank in question's accounts.

... For the full story:

http://www.mineweb.net/gold_silver/555507.htm

Kitco's Nadler can only sneer at Blanchard report, not answer it

Section:

12:35a ET Thursday, January 4, 2007

Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:

Resource Investor's Jon A. Nones has gotten a bit of a debate going between Blanchard & Co.'s research director, Neal R. Ryan, author of the recent critique of the secrecy of central bank gold lending, and Jon Nadler, an analyst for Kitco.com. Nadler has been doing a lot of sneering at the Blanchard report, which Ryan has considered unfair. So Resource Investor has given them a chance to elaborate.

Ted Butler: Reflections

Section:

3:23p ET Wednesday, January 3, 2006

Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:

Silver market analyst Ted Butler reflects on the last year and the one ahead for silver, congratulates the silver exchange-traded fund, and observes that the short position in silver is more concentrated and manipulative (and more promising for silver longs) than ever. You can find Butler's new essay, "Reflections," at GoldSeek's companion site, SilverSeek, here: